African Oral Narratives
Military Intelligence in Apartheid-era South Africa

HIV/Aids

Maandagshoek has a very active volunteer group assisting community members who suffer from HIV/AIDS. Members of this group are very committed and visit the sick and take care of them at their homes as to reduce their visits to hospital. They have identified, and have a clear understanding of the detriment the lack of proper nutrition has on a person infected with HIV/AIDS. In both Rammolutsi and Sebokeng HIV/AIDS is regarded by residents as one of the main problems in the area, together with unemployment and poverty. A Rammolutsi resident claims that around 80% of the people in this community are HIV-positive and feels that people should be encouraged to be tested in order to get treatment. A Sebokeng resident alleges that many poor HIV-positive people allow their CD4 cell count to drop by not taking the Antiretrovirals (ARVs) in order to continue receiving government grants. For them it is more important to receive money for food. This is confirmed by one resident who says: "…if a person is HIV positive she must get good nutrition but if those people are so poor they are going to die because they have got no money to buy food that they must eat." Many residents also maintain that HIV/AIDS is not a topic often discussed. As one resident says: "In our culture we are not allowed to talk about those things…" Another confirms: "To be honest in this community, no one talks about HIV/AIDS… I don't know if it is ignorance or anything but I don't often hear people talking about HIV/AIDS." He continues: "Experience had taught me that people are mostly afraid of the truth. People are afraid to face the truth at most points. So in this community I think that is the problem, people are afraid to hear the truth about HIV/AIDS."

This interview with Alinah Malekgosi Obie, a home-based care giver working through local hospice, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Rammolutsi in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.
This interview with Bafana Ezekiel Makhanya, a retrenched SAMANCOR worker and community activist, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Sebokeng in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.
This interview with Maria Mabeko Nkomo, a divorced traditional healer/herbalist, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Sebokeng in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.
This interview with Sara Maduma, a worker at a private clinic in the nearby town of Vereeninging, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Sebokeng in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.
This interview with Tsebo Knowledge Ngema, a recently finished matric student, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Sebokeng in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.
This interview with government social worker Priscilla Matshidiso Ramogale was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Sebokeng in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.
This interview with the volunteer group of community carers at the Mabaso Community Care Centre in Maandagshoek was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.
This interview with volunteer care-givers Veronica Matsie and Nkele Manyanga was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.
This is a still image of Bafana Makhanya, retrenched SAMANCOR worker and community activist of Sebokeng, during an oral history interview conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in 2007 for SAHA's Alternative History Project, entitled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'. The still image was derived from the DVD 'A Dream Deferred' which was produced in 2008 as part of this project.
This is a still image of Priscilla Ramogale, a social worker from Sebokeng, during an oral history interview conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in 2007 for SAHA's Alternative History Project, entitled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'. The still image was derived from the DVD 'A Dream Deferred' which was produced in 2008 as part of this project.
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