African Oral Narratives
Military Intelligence in Apartheid-era South Africa

Interviews

Traditional Leadership

Although Maandagshoek is formally governed by a district municipality, it is informally governed by traditional chieftainship authorities who consider the community's land to be held in collective 'trust'. According to a number of residents the indigenous culture of the Bapedi is fast disappearing. Before 1994, a resident explains: "[we] were ploughing and doing things according to tradition of the people of Bapedi" and after 1994 "… we lost our culture because of the new government." A female resident also finds that gender issues come into play with being a female Bapedi chief and that it is complicated being a woman leader. The people, she says, can't be led by a woman. She also claims that there are two parties in the royal house – the Congress of Traditional Leaders of South Africa (CONTRALESA) and the Sediba sa bogoshi. She believes that the South African government respects the former and not the latter, as CONTRALESA gets government support in the form of office buildings and cars, whereas "…us the Sediba sa bogoshi we don't get the support." Furthermore, the local municipality does not even seem to be aware of who the Chiefs of Maandagshoek are. However, she does believe that most people in general respect traditional authority. She does not get a salary, but the community members largely grant their support and assistance in times of need, something, she feels, the government fails to do continuously. Mining in Maandagshoek has also undoubtedly added to the destruction of the cultural well-being of this poor, rural community.

The first interview with Emmanuel Mokgoga, community leader/activist and spokesperson of the Maandagshoek Development Committee, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

This interview with Flora Mpusi and Flora Makwa, both elderly women in Chief Vilakazi’s household, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

This interview with Chief Sonias Vilakazi of the Matimatsatsi community was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

This interview with Simon Vilakazi, son of Chief Vilakazi and secretary for the Matimatsatsi Tribal Authority, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

This is the first interview with Joyce Kgwete conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

The first part of the interview with Isaac Kgwete, chief of Maandagshoek, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

The second part of the interview with Chief Isaac Kgwete was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2007 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

Part one of the second interview with Emmanuel Mokgoga, community leader/activist and spokesperson of the Maandagshoek Development Committee, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2008 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

This is the second interview with Joyce Kgwete conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2008 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

Part two of the second interview with Emmanuel Mokgoga, community leader/activist and spokesperson of the Maandagshoek Development Committee, was conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava in Maandagshoek in 2008 as part of the South African History Archive's Alternative History Project, titled 'Forgotten Voices in the Present'.

Validate: XHTML | CSS